Employment and HR Law

Employment and HR Law Specialists

If you’re an employer, you need to make sure that you’re complying with employment law. This includes things like making sure that you have the right contracts in place, and that you’re treating your employees fairly.

If you’re an employee, you need to know your rights. This includes knowing what your contract says, and understanding your entitlements if you’re unfairly treated by your employer.

Employment law covers a wide range of topics, including:

  • Discrimination
  • Dismissal
  • Contracts
  • Wages and hours

If you’re dealing with an employment law issue, it’s a good idea to speak to a solicitor who specializes in this area. They can give you specific advice about your situation, and help you understand your rights and options.

Speak to Professional Solicitors

Contact us at Prime Legal Solicitors today at info@primelegalsolicitors.co.uk or 01706 644144 for more information so we can help you.

HR Support

When it comes to employment law, there are a lot of different options available to employers in the UK. But with so many different laws and regulations in place, it can be difficult to know where to turn for help. That’s where HR support comes in.

HR support services can provide advice and guidance on a wide range of employment law issues, from hiring and firing to health and safety. They can also help with more complex issues such as discrimination and equal opportunities.

There are a number of different ways to get HR support, from using an online service to speaking to a solicitor. And while some employers may feel like they can handle HR themselves, it’s always worth getting expert advice when it comes to something as important as employment law.

So if you’re looking for HR support, make sure you explore all of your options and get expert advice to ensure you’re complying with the law.

Contact us at Prime Legal Solicitors today at info@primelegalsolicitors.co.uk or 01706 644144 for more information so we can help you.

Settlement Agreements

The law in the United Kingdom provides certain protections for employees who have been unfairly dismissed from their jobs. One of the ways an employee can challenge their dismissal is by signing a settlement agreement.

A settlement agreement, also known as a compromise agreement, is a legally binding contract between an employer and employee. The agreement sets out the terms of the employee’s departure from the company, and can include things like severance pay, continuation of benefits, and reference requests. In exchange for signing the agreement, the employee agrees not to pursue any legal claims against the employer.

Settlement agreements are typically used in cases of unfair dismissal, but can also be used in other situations where an employer and employee have disagreements. For example, an employee might sign a settlement agreement if they’re leaving their job voluntarily, but want to negotiate a better severance package.

If you’re considering signing a settlement agreement, it’s important to understand your rights and obligations under the law. You should also consult with a solicitor to ensure that the agreement is in your best interests.

Speak to Professional Solicitors

Contact us at Prime Legal Solicitors today at info@primelegalsolicitors.co.uk or 01706 644144 for more information so we can help you.

Employment Tribunal – ET1 – Claim form

You must make your claim within 3 months (less one day) of the date of the event you’re complaining about. The date your employment ended counts as the date of the event.

To make a claim, you need to fill in an Employment Tribunal (ET1) form and submit it to your local tribunal office.

The ET1 form is available on GOV.UK.

Your claim will be allocated to 1 of 4 tracks depending on its value and how complex it is:

  • fast track – for claims worth up to £25,000 that are likely to take no more than 2 days to hear
  • multi track – for claims worth more than £25,000 or that are likely to take more than 2 days to hear
  • small claims track – for claims worth £10,000 or less (you can’t use this track if you’re claiming for unpaid holiday pay)
  • voluntary settlement track – for claims that have been allocated to either the fast track or multi track, but where the parties agree to try and settle their differences without going to a full hearing

You must complete the heading section of the ET1 form before you submit it. The heading section includes:

  • your name, address and contact details
  • your employer’s name, address and contact details (if you know them)

In the body of the ET1 form, you’ll need to give information about:

  • your employment – including your job title, start date and what’s happened since then
  • the complaint you’re making – for example, if you think you were unfairly dismissed
  • any law you think has been broken – for example, the Equality Act 2010
  • how much money you want the tribunal to order your employer to pay you (known as a ‘remedy’)

You must also sign the ET1 form to confirm that the information you’ve given is true.

Once you’ve submitted your ET1 form, the tribunal will contact your employer and ask them to respond. They have 28 days to do this.

If they don’t respond or they dispute your claim, the tribunal will hold a case management hearing. This is where the tribunal decides what will happen next in your case.

At the case management hearing, the tribunal might:

  • give directions about what needs to happen before the final hearing, for example ordering your employer to provide certain documents
  • decide which track your case should be allocated to
  • make a decision about whether your claim can continue (known as ‘strike out’)

If the tribunal decides to strike out your claim or dismiss it without a hearing, you can appeal against this decision.

If your employer agrees to settle your claim without going to a full hearing, they’ll need to fill in an Employment Tribunal consent order form and send it to the tribunal. The form must say how much they’re going to pay you and when they’re going to pay you. Once the tribunal gets the form, they’ll make a consent order. This is a legally binding agreement and means your case has ended.

If your employer doesn’t agree to settle your claim or if the tribunal decides that your case should go to a full hearing, the next step is for each side to prepare their evidence. This will usually involve sending documents to the other side and exchanging witness statements.

You and your employer will then have a final hearing, where you’ll present your evidence and argue your case in front of a judge. The judge will make a decision about your case, which is known as an ‘order’.

If the tribunal finds in your favour, they’ll order your employer to pay you a ‘remedy’. This can include:

  • back pay – for example, if you’ve been out of work since you were dismissed and the tribunal decides you should have been paid during that time
  • compensation – for example, if you’ve suffered financial loss because of what happened or if you’ve suffered distress or injury to your feelings
  • reinstatement – this means being put back in the job you had before (also known as ‘reinstatement to employment’)

Your employer might also be ordered to take action to stop the problem happening again in the future. For example, they might be ordered to change their equal opportunities policy.

If the tribunal decides that your employer has treated you unlawfully, they can order them to pay you up to £25,000 in compensation. This is known as an ‘uplift’.

If you’re not happy with the tribunal’s decision, you might be able to appeal against it. For example, you might be able to appeal if you think the judge has made a legal mistake. You must usually lodge your appeal within 42 days of getting the original tribunal decision.

Speak to Professional Solicitors

Contact us at Prime Legal Solicitors today at info@primelegalsolicitors.co.uk or 01706 644144 for more information so we can help you.

ET3 response form

If your employer disagrees with your claim, they’ll need to fill in and return an ET3 form to the tribunal. The ET3 form must say:

  • which parts of your claim they’re contesting
  • why they’re contesting each part of your claim
  • what remedy they think you should receive, if any

Your employer must return the ET3 form within 28 days of receiving the ET1 claim form.

If your employer doesn’t respond to your claim or they dispute it, the tribunal will hold a case management hearing. This is where the tribunal decides what will happen next in your case.

At the case management hearing, the tribunal might:

  • give directions about what needs to happen before the final hearing, for example ordering your employer to provide certain documents
  • decide which track your case should be allocated to
  • make a decision about whether your claim can continue (known as ‘strike out’)

If the tribunal decides to strike out your claim or dismiss it without a hearing, you can appeal against this decision.

If your employer agrees to settle your claim without going to a full hearing, they’ll need to fill in an Employment Tribunal consent order form and send it to the tribunal. The form must say how much they’re going to pay you and when they’re going to pay you. Once the tribunal gets the form, they’ll make a consent order. This is a legally binding agreement and means your case has ended.

If your employer doesn’t agree to settle your claim or if the tribunal decides that your case should go to a full hearing, the next step is for each side to prepare their evidence. This will usually involve sending documents to the other side and exchanging witness statements.

You and your employer will then have a final hearing, where you’ll present your evidence and argue your case in front of a judge. The judge will make a decision about your case, which is known as an ‘order’.

If the tribunal finds in your favour, they’ll order your employer to pay you a ‘remedy’. This can include:

  • back pay – for example, if you’ve been out of work since you were dismissed and the tribunal decides you should have been paid during that time
  • compensation – for example, if you’ve suffered financial loss because of what happened or if you’ve suffered distress or injury to your feelings
  • reinstatement – this means being put back in the job you had before (also known as ‘reinstatement to employment’)

Your employer might also be ordered to take action to stop the problem happening again in the future. For example, they might be ordered to change their equal opportunities policy.

If the tribunal decides that your employer has treated you unlawfully, they can order them to pay you up to £25,000 in compensation. This is known as an ‘uplift’.

If you’re not happy with the tribunal’s decision, you might be able to appeal against it. For example, you might be able to appeal if you think the judge has made a legal mistake. You must usually lodge your appeal within 42 days of getting the original tribunal decision.

ET3 response form

If your employer disagrees with your claim, they’ll need to fill in and return an ET3 form to the tribunal. The ET3 form must say:

  • which parts of your claim they’re contesting
  • why they’re contesting each part of your claim
  • what remedy they think you should receive, if any

Your employer must return the ET3 form within 28 days of receiving the ET1 claim form.

If your employe doesn’t respond to your claim or the dispute it, the tribunal wil hold a case management hearing. This is where the tribunal decides what will happen next in your case.

At the case management hearing, the tribunal might:

  • give directions about what needs to happen before the final hearing, for example ordering your employer to provide certain documents
  • decide which track your case should be allocated to
  • make a decision about whether your claim can continue (known as ‘strike out’)

If the tribunal decides to strike out your claim or dismiss it without a hearing, you can appeal against this decision.

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